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of south africa, black and white, would go to the polls in if first democratic election in that country, and elect mandela their president with 62% of the vote. mandela set about what to do what seemed to be an impossible task, stitching together these two people, one oppressed, degraded for years, the other a minority, fearing they would be completely disempowered. in his inaugural speech, mandela stressed it would not be that way. >> and i enter a covenant to build a society in which all south africans, both black and white, will be able to walk tall without any fear in their hearts. a rainbow nation at peace with itself and the world. >> mandela would transfer power after a five-year term and live to become the founder of a new nation, the living embodiment of its highest aspirations. joining me now is rohid. i cannot imagine the mood in south africa at this moment. >> it's a strange mood and it's very early in the morning here. so it's difficult to gauge the mood across the country. but what i can say outside the home of nelson mandela in the suburbs of johannesburg is this huge cro
elected president of a free and democratic south africa, and that actually came to happen. how would you judge his handling the presidency as that first democratically elected president in south african history? >> i'm glad you said that because he was the first democratically elected president, not the first black president. he was that because everybody had the right to vote, including africa africans. i was born in 1952, so i have no memory of this speech in 1952, but i do remember as a student at stanford be being involved in the divestment movement, trying to make sure that southern africa would divest from the system and apartheid would be ended. that was continued when i went to law school in the '70s and continued into practice in the '80s when we had thousands of people protest during the reagan years. and it was people of every stripe, and his legacy is something that will have to last forever and i hope that we won't just simply honor him when his birthday comes up, but we should think about a global, a global remembrance of this day, of nelson mandela's birth, not his death b
temps a free man . then it was elected president of the anc in nineteen ninety one. he continued to negotiate the president of the butte occurred to seek an end to the country's racist goals. three men were wanted them to the price in nineteen ninety three. nope all. i didn't fight at all. when paul. it was. apartheid when he came to an end in nineteen ninety four when like some africans were down to play for the first time in the country's history the agency won the parliamentary elections and nelson mandela was elected president of south africa eyes before you. they would get involved. by the bottle all this time. you have shown such a crime patient to detonation. will be made this card. as a whole updated. from the rooftops free at last the june nineteen ninety nine off to just one presidential term councilman dan everett on from politics. he remained committed to promoting peace and justice. the counts against fifty thousand pre invasion of iraq. and what comes out of the team needs in two thousand and five he revealed to the that is eldest son had delayed if the disease. th
, would go to the polls in the first democratic election in that country and elect mandela their president, with 62% of the national vote. mandela set about to do what at the time seemed an impossible task, stitching together these two people. one oppressed, degraded for years, the other now a minority and fearing they would be completely disempowered and the new republic would be dominated by vengeance and incrimination. in his inaugural speech, mandela stressed it would not be that way. >> and that what i build in a society, in which all south african, both black and white, will be able to walk tall without any fear in their hearts, assured of their right to human dig any. a rainbow nation at peace with itself and the world. >> mandela would peacefully transfer power after a single five-year term and lived to become a wise older statesman, the founder of a new nation. joining me now from johannesburg, south africa, is roheed, correspondent for our sister nation. and i cannot imagine the mood in south africa at this moment. >> reporter: it's a strange mood, and it's very early in the morn
was lifted. that year he walked out a free man. mandela was elected president of the anc in 1991. he continued to negotiate with president f.w. de klerk to seek an end to the country's racist laws. both men were awarded the nobel peace prize in 1993. >> we can stop the forward movement of these forces in the country. inapartheid came to an end 1994 when black south africans were allowed to vote for the first time in the country's history. the anc won the harlem in three elections and nelson mandela was elected president of south africa. >> i stand before you filled with pride and joy. pride in the people of the country. determination -- enjoy that which you can loudly proclaim from the rooftops -- free at last. >> in june of 1999 after one presidential term, nelson mandela retired from politics but remained committed to promoting peace and justice. he spoke out against the 2003 invasion of iraq and work at -- for aids. on policy he revealed his son had died of the disease. the last three years were marked with hospitalizations as he struggled with respiratory problems. had a lung inf
to the killings. francis hollande says the idea is to head as fast as possible towards elections. >> the french president is speaking at a summit in parris. jacky rowland was there. >> at the end of a 2-day summit the french took the opportunity of having so many afghan leaders under one roof to stay on for a short while and talk about the central african republic. it was decided to increase troops to 2,600. and to get rebels into their barracks, into their bases. in the longer term there are interreligious tensions on the country in order to hold a donor's conference. part of the reinforcements are an enlargement of the french contingent. francis hollande now has 16 undertroops. france will always be engaged in mali. 3,000 troops there, and 1600 in the central african republic. it wants to turn over african policing to african police-keeping forces. d in the two countries forbe some time to come. >> china irritated some nations and the u.s. south korea responded by making their own zone. a large part of it overlambs the japan zone and south korea has an air defense zone. its boundary is being
elected president. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> don't call me. i'll call you. >> his magnetic sense of humor, mandela was loved by everyone from world leaders to celebrities. >> when he visited the u.s., aretha franklin sang to him. tonight she's with us sharing her special memories only on "night line". >> this special edition of night line will be back in 60 sec >> this is a special edition of "nightline" nelson mandela, a man who changed the world. >> good evening and thanks for joining us. nelson mandela's face is one of the most recognizable in the world. and tonight in south africa this symbol of racial equality died at the age of 95. from boxer to advocate, prisoner to peace prize winner, seemed mandela was always fighting for a cause greater than himself. it's clear that his legacy as a champion of human rights, equality and freedom will be forever etched in our minds and memories. >> like so many around the globe, i cannot fully imagine my own life without the example that nelson mandela set. and so long as i live, i will do what i can to learn from h
. but non-white people need add internal passport. papers please. at the end of world war ii, the election in south africa in 1948 unexpectedly brought to power a nationalist government on a platform they called apartness. in their language, it was pronounced apartheid. they started codifying immediately all the various ways that they could separate the population by race and treat people according to the ways that they thought the various races should be treated. in 1949, the prohibition of mixed marriages act which banned people of different races from getting married to each other, whether or not you got married, the immorality act of 1950 made sexual relations between different races a criminal act. also in 1950 the population registration act which made everyone in the country register by race and receive a racial classification, black, white, indian or colored. those were the four categorieca. and there were a million sub categories beneath those. not beneath white of course, white was just white. but for everybody else it could be a little more complicated. also in 1950, the group a
in prison. he was the first black elected president of stojakovic in 1994. let's learn more about his life. >> a freeman taking his first steps into a new south africa. >> from prisoner to president. nelson mandela's 1990 release from jail signaled the end of south africa's racist policy of apartheid. he would go on to become the untry's first true democratically elected leader. >> i, nelson mandela do here swear to be faithful to the republic of south africa. >> born to a chief of a small village, mandela was one of 13 children and the first member of his family to attend school. in the 1930's he began opposing authority and the authorities that made colored south africans second-class citizens. as white south africa became more aggressive, so did he. as the head of the armed wing of the african national congress, mandela led violent sabbatini town hall attacks and was arrested and tried in 1962. he would spend 27 years in jail, but he was never forgotten. eventually international and internal pressure led the president to announce apartheid would be dismantled and mandela would walk free
cast their ballot in the first democratic election. this morning applause for the first black voter. mandela became the country's president, the first elected by all of its people. >> we are all south africans. we have had a good fight but now this is a time to heal the old wound and to build a new south africa. ♪ >> reporter: after ruling for five years, nelson mandela passed the torch to the next generation and became an elder statesman to the world, a fighter, a visionary. the voice of his people and more accomplished. >> abc news. >> today following his passing the new south african president, president zuma said our nation has lost its greatest son and our people have lost a father. >> a man whose fighting spirit was matched by his humility and compassion. few hew human beings present either one of those sides in the amount that he did and he had both. >> absolutely. [ dad ] ah! lily... she pretty much lives in her favorite princess dress. and she's not exactly tidy. even if she gets a stain she'll wear it for a week straight. so i use tide to get out those week old stains an
policy of apartheid. on to become the country's first truly democratically elected leader. >> i, nelson mandela, do hereby to be faithful to the republic of south africa. a born in a small village to local chief, mandela was one of 13 children and the first member of his family to attend school. in the 1940's, he began opposing minority's policy of apartheid laws that segregated society. first, mandela was inspired by approach of nonviolent resistance. as white south africa became more aggressive, so did he. as the head of the armed wing of the african national congress, mandela led violent sabotage attacks and was arrested and in 1962. he would spend 27 years in jail. he was never forgotten. eventually, international and internal pressure led president klerk to announce apartheid would be dismantled and mandela would walk free. rather than seek richer view showing, nelson mandela reached oppressors.ormer he tried to heal a divided nation. and the clerk -- de klerk shared the nobel peace prize. >> in 1994, he voted for the with millions of his fellow black south africans. became a state
, he was able to vote for himself in a free election. he won, and was inaugurated as the first black president of his country. >> on this day, you took destiny into your own hands. you decided that would nothing would stop you from electing the government of your choice. country's infrastructure. he met the white house, meeting with three sitting presidents. in 2002 george w. bush presented him with the medal of freedom. president obama met mandela once in 2005, when obama was a senator. after one term as president mandela stepped down. he did not slow his pace. his charitable foundation raised money for a variety of causes. when south africa hosted soccer's world cup tournament in july 2010 he made his last major public appearance at the final game. the crowd honoured him with a thunderous ovation. his third wife, grassa michelle, the former first lady of mozambique was at his side during his battles with prostate cancer and lung infections that hospitalized him in the end. >> never, and never again, that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another, an
election where all races were allowed to participate, nelson mandela was overwhelming elected to the presidency. he was battling a respiratory infection since early june. a remarkable man and a remarkable life and a model of stick-to-itiveness and never give up. a man of tremendous heart and compassion. dead this night at the age of 95. joining me tonight for our coverage on the passing of nelson mandela and joy reed of the grio and also with us tonight, dr. james peterson of lehigh university. i will start with you. a remarkable man. a life that is a true treasure to humanity. >> he is a star across all lines. >> you cannot compartmentalize him to a politician or a founting of south africa. here's a man who fought the hate and the bigotry and the institutional apartheid of a nation without internalizing it. he was able to reconcile a nation and move it forward and revolutionize it nonviolently, without firing one bullet. i was an election observer in 19 nor in johansburg the night they lowered the flag of apartheid. we met with him many times and to see this transition happen
to know who they are. they say it was a miracle they managed to pull off the '94 election because and you eluded to it, there was a lot of opposition from the freedom -- >> right, the zulu. >> and the whites, the awb and there was a big, big problem that could have exploded into -- >> a lot of people forgot that -- >> yeah, there was who ran ifpd and shootouts and gunfights. i remember going to a lot of anc funerals and ifc funerals -- >> very touch and go. >> given that election -- >> even in the month before, two months before i remember a huge gunfight in johannesburg. >> one of the things, anderson, we walked together on a long walk of freedom that ended at his inauguration. he wanted to do another book not so much from that period to the presidency but how close south africa came to a civil war. i have to say, i don't want to -- the smirks, the reputation of mr. declerk and formed a partnership and couldn't have done it without each other. mandela in conversations with me for "a long walk to freedom" did feel betrayed during the creation of the constitution and that famous scene when
. on february 11th, 1990. the world rejoiced. he worked with his former enemy to move toward free elections and the end of apartheid. he and frederik willem de klerk were jointly awarded the nobel peace prize in 1993 and the following year this, the world again looked on in wonder and joy as millions of black south africans lined up to vote for the first time. nelson mandela was elected president in a landslide. >> so help me god. >> reporter: a few months later at his inauguration attended by scores of world leaders, he declared a new era for his beloved country. >> never again shall it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another. >> reporter: terry moran, abc news. >> now what happens next is nelson mandela's body has already been moved to the hospital. he will be given a state funeral. not only that, but all of the flags will be at half staff until the funeral is over. there's a ten-day mourning period for south africans, which obviously starts now. >> just amazing. it's a life that goes beyond anything a book or hollywood could ever make up. truly
election. and mandela became south africa's first black president. >> we are all south africans. we have had a good fight. but now, this is a time to heal the old wounds and to build a new south africa. >> reporter: after ruling for five years -- >> africa. >> reporter: -- nelson mandela passed the torch to the next generation and became an elder statesman to the world. a fighter. a visionary. the voice of his people. and a moral compass for us all. >> i am the product of africa. and her long cherished dream, of a rebirth that can now be realized. so that all of her children may play in the sun. >> his life, dedicated to that dream. abc's christiane amanpour joins us now. you covered the struggle in south africa. his early days as president. one of the points you make, is he kept the country together in a time it could easily have been torn apart. >> absolutely. in fact, his people say that it is a miracle that they pulled off that first election. just as he came out of prison, there was still terrible violence from the apartheid, the zulus from the extremist white parties. there were ki
in order to ensure their participation in the elections and the inauguration ceremonies will now be resolved as a result of recent consultations. this would be a welcome demonstration by the private sector of its involvement in the beautiful future we are all trying to build. we have devoted time to a discussion of economic questions because they are fundamental to the realisation of the fundamental objectives of the reconstruction and development programme below i mention some of the work in which the relevant governments are already involved to translate these objectives into reality. the government will take steps to ensure the provision of clean water on the basis of the principle of water security for all and the introduction of proper sanitation sensitive to the protection of the environment. we are determined to address the dire housing shortage in a vigorous manner, acting together with the private sector and the communities in need of shelter. health also remains a fundamental building block of the humane society we are determined to create through the implementation of
a tumultuous runup to the elections. knowing where he was going and being a very steady hand and voice of reason through what was a very turbulent time in the runup to the election. >> voice of reason, stan greenberg. you worked with him during his election. for a man who became known for the power of forgiveness and reconciliation. as a politician, he also had something of a ruthless streak. >> absolutely. he had clear goals. one of the thing that ran through was the desire to make sure there was racially inclusive politics. there were strong strands within the anc, within south africa, that were centered on black consciousness. he was intent on having an election with mandate that reduced their role. he focused on, as you know, the pan african congress, polling 2% or 3% of the poll. historically, they played a big role in africa and the liberation struggle. he wanted to use the election to send a message this would be an inclusive country. >> and jendayi frazer. talking about the relationship with people he didn't necessarily get along with. we know f.w. de klerk. they shared a nobel
africans that they could actually feel safe in the hands of the government they had just elected. it is impossible to exaggerate the extent to which he had to more political stature. everybody around him i think acknowledged that he was head and shoulders above them. there were rivalries but not about him. >> you were saying earlier about the memories of the day when he was released. i'm just wondering about the significance of that election when he became the first lack president of south africa. of thee your memories experience of that day? >> when all this was happening, i was young. , in fact.young i was too young to even vote when millions of south africans were bused in at a school. thet of people were wearing vivars and shouting " mandela." nelsonthe people that mandela was with him fighting for the liberation. there was a lot of nervousness. as much as people were shouting, there were a lot a police presence. people were worried about what was going to happen. what are we expecting for the next day. as you rightly say, a lot of people, not everyone was happy about the rel
as mandela. >> simon: national elections were held. the man who had spent 27 years in prison was now a presidential candidate. >> we are one country. we are one people. i cherish the idea of a new south africa. >> simon: april 26, 1994. it's difficult for anyone born in a democracy to so much as imagine the thrill of putting a ballot in a box. >> i slept with my i.d. under my pillow so that i musn't forget it. how long have we been waiting! >> i'm going to vote, for the first time, as a black man. >> it was amazing. to see hundreds and thousands of people who had never cast a vote before waiting in long lines, people shouting for joy. that sense of happiness, that sense of freedom, that sense of liberation. >> for the people of south africa, this is indeed a joyous night for the human spirit. >> simon: there was no suspense election night. mandela won by a landslide, as everyone knew he would. ( applause ) >> it is you, the people, who are our true heroes. you have shown such a patient determination to reclaim the country and joy that we can loudly proclaim "free at last!" ( cheers a
on a number of occasions, from the time he left prison to his election as south africa's president. she prepared this remembrance. >> to my generation, the onetha, nelson mandela was a towering man of myth and legend, of action and passion, of selfless sacrifice and before any of us dreamed he became the embodiment of a notorious decades long struggling against oppression, these were images from the book, mandela, the authorized portrait, helps tell the story of mandela's long road to freedom,. >>> born in 1818 on -- 1918 ons, the legend was nurtured. spending some of the happiest years of his boyhood, this is a gentle place of rolling hills and farms, where children still play as he did. in times, they would call him madiba, his clan name for respect. here, boys even ones like mandela descended by royalty, were tradition that taught respect and responsibility for others. as mandela grew into manhood, the kosa mantle, deprived and demedian mandela and his fellow africans. in 1948, oppression was legalized into a system known as apartheid. as a young lawyer in the 1940s, mandela joined t
that republicans since the end of the last election have been licking their wounds and trying to figure out the best way to do two things. one is close the gender gap among voters and also, try to recruit more female candidates here in congress to be members of congress. this is something that came up this morning when i interviewed the house majority leader, boehner's number two, eric cantor. here's his take. >> do you not know how to talk to women, sir? >> we have any number of republican women in our conference who are real leaders on all kinds of -- >> but is there a problem with men in the republican party, your rank and file, who don't know how to communicate to reach female voters? >> you know, it is our policies that are going to appeal to both female and male voters. >> but they haven't. >> when we're talking about health care right now, our health care starts with people and patients. >> mr. boehner a little more candid than his number two there. dana, a lot of this is obviously about trying to prevent the kind of gaffes we heard, for example, from former congressman, senate candi
elected president in this country in 1994. he will lie there for three days. the first day will be for vips and visitors coming in from around the world, to come pay their respects. ordinary south africans are expected to line up of course to come and say good-bye to the man they call the father of this nation. then on day nine, so whether that is friday or saturday next week, he will be flown by military aircraft, accompanied by his family to his ancestral homestead in the eastern cape region. this is where he said he wanted to be buried, where his final resting place is to be. the hills, the rural area where he grew up as a barefoot young boy walking and shepherding sheep through the hills. he had a very nostalgic memory of those times and he very much wanted to be laid to rest there. so the funeral will take place in this grand amphitheater of rural south africa, really not much around there, so expect to see heads of state, royalty from around the world make this incredible journey not just to the southern tip of africa, but to this rural homestead and it's there that t
george h.w. bush said the following. >> president clinton was in the white house when mandela was elected president of south africa. clinton saying the following. >> former president jimmy carter paying tribute to nelson mandela saying, his passion for freedom and justice created new hope for generations that have impressed people worldwide. the president of the united states often referred to as the leader of the free world but yet you can see from the statements in each of these men, they were in awe of nelson mandela. >> and a simple beginning to life. when you look at the place where he is going to be buried and cnn will be taking you through the days of mourning, ten days of morning in sfrouth africa. he had the desire to be buried in his hometown. >> he is going home. >> yes, he is going home. >> we will continue to bring you the life of nelson mandela all morning. >>> now to another big story. >> the weather. when we come back, we are going to tell you about this deadly winter storm that is wreaking havoc across our country. hundreds of flights have already been canceled. roads are
government or how we end apartheid or how we have democratic elections. >> reporter: the negotiations begin in secret. the government does not want it publicly known that they are speaking with the enemy. mandela by not consulting with the anc leadership nknows they can disavow them if the negotiations go poorly. it is a risk he must take. >> the reason he made that decision is because he realized somebody had to start doing something. >> reporter: in 1988 the 70-year-old mandela is moved to yet another prison outside cape town. >> he's sent to another prison which is like a country club compared to where he had been before. >> reporter: negotiations continue, and slowly other prisoners are released. including mandela's friend and mentor, walter susulu in october 1989. >> there was this sense that mandela would be getting out of jail, and people were generally excited. you could feel it in the air. >> reporter: to the majority of black south africans, mandela's release and all that it represents is what they have spent nearly 30 years hoping for, fighting for, dying for. as that buildup rea
in south africa. but having him work with his team and the pollster for the anc during that first election, there were three things that really struck me. one was just his enormous clarity and vision for the country and bringing the country together. the second was his great pragmatism. there were a set of election rules that came down that were really disadvantageous to mandela and to the anc. we were all very upset by those rules, and he was just very calm and said no, we'll make it work. find a way to make it work. he refused to fight over the rules and just said we'll make it work. >> give us some unsight into that. what were his unique qualities that allowed him to make it work? in the face of what seemed to be something that was very difficult if not insurmountable. >> i think, first of all, was just the clarity of his own vision. the amount of thinking that he had done about where he wanted to take the country and what reconciliation meant. and how he had already put that to practice. that was so fundamental to his soul. and what was interesting is, of course, there were many factio
, until the peaceful end of white rule in 1990. he was elected president in 1994. next up am a we will show you his inauguration speech from 1994. [applause] >> it is my great pleasure to announce the president of the south africa, mr. nelson mandela. [applause] >> your majesties, your royal highnesses, distinguished guests, comrades, and friends, today, all of us do, by our presence here, and by our celebrations in other parts of our country and the world confer glory and hope to newborn liberty. out of the experience of an extraordinary human disaster that lasted too long must be born a society of which all humanity will be proud. our daily deeds as ordinary south africans must produce an actual south african reality that will reinforce humanity's belief in justice, strengthen its confidence in the nobility of the human soul, and sustain all our hopes for a glorious life for all. all this we owe both to ourselves and to the peoples of the world who are so well represented here today. to my compatriots, i have no hesitation in saying that each one of us is as intimately attached
in as president after the country's first multi racial elections the nineteen ninety nine he had been due to his trusted friend becky the band was still active until he finally said good byes to the ice in the eye in two thousand and four. i am if i have to form dvds. for the place. to know what this record. in the face numerous fights including the african states. in the life of one of this out. i know all those also who came late. he began hosting the twenty ten football world cup he said that dad built into the red you you you this. with that we do. i do. he said. his health was failing but he still welcome this to some tunes american fans lady michelle obama took in the open. former us president bill clinton but his ninety fourth birthday. in november twenty two of the national bank but nonetheless based on the new nets. by now it was recognized with respect to all of the well i have been the two. a whole. and then use the content of the people who are really nice. that too the acorn be auctioned to the community. i honor her. i find a stall is showing no signs of weakening in all your effor
train workers and volunteers who would conduct the first multiracial elections in south africa. he was authentic. he was a giant. you know, when you were around him, you felt very special. he was joyful. he had a sense of humor, but there was this dignity about him, this strength about him. i will always remember his grace and his courage. >> and to donna's point, john, i want to bring you in. she talks about him being a giant. .headlines, these are one of the days you are looking at the headlines. "usa today" saying the death of a giant. you were there when nelson mandela was inaugurated in 1994. you've also covered many world events but you will never forget that moment. why? >> professionally it was the most powerful thing i've ever seen in my life. i say professionally because i carve out a special spot for my children. if you think of the day of inauguration, u.s. vice president al gore led the delegation. the ceremony was outside in what they call the union building, parliament building. it was the most dramatic, powerful moment of south african military brass, white generals
nobel peace prize and became the first black president and nation's first democratically elected president and touched millions of lives around the world. mandela compares to dr. king and gandhi as nonviolent agents of change and progress. pope francis said the sted fast commitment in proving dignity and forging a new south africa built on firm foundations on nonviolence should inspire generations to put it in front of their political aspirations. plans are already under way for memorials and of course his state funeral. here in america, flags are lowered at the capitol and the white house. and candlelight vigils are planned for tonight. president obama, who was inspired by mandela's life and visited with his family this past summer will be among hundreds of world leaders heading to pretoria to honor him. michelle kosinski is outside mandela's home and where the official memorial service will be held. it's 10:00 p.m. and crowds have been swelling for 24 hours. what's the feeling there? >> reporter: that's right. a lot of people didn't even find out what it happened until midnight
mandela made historiy becoming the first democratically elected president in 1974. he did it after spending 27 years in prison. mike hanna looks back at the life of a man who became a global symbol of resistance. >> death does not diminish the memory of the smile or the twin twinkle in the eyes. outside the hospital they are content on celebrating a life as much as mourning his death. it was a life richly lived, one in which nelson mandela was prepared to give you everything, including his freedom, for what he believed. >> a lot of people feel it is futile for us to take peace and nonviolence, against a government whose apply is fighting unarmed people. >> they spent 10,053 days in prist. a some time that only made his cause stronger. nelson mandela was a place on the poster, his laws outlawed and found in books and footage that few in south africa saw. that changed in 1990 when he walked out of prison. among those the battle to wage apartheid. >> i have spoken about freedom in my lifetime. your struggle and your commitment has released me to stand before you today. >> nelson mande
that then lead to elections. >> more now on our top story. the death of nelson mandela. south africa's foreign minister. at mandela's insistence. he served in the first post apartheid government. >> that kept nelson mandela in jail, and he then served under mandela in south africa's first cabinet. it was his task to publicly defend the continued imprisonment of mandela and other political developments. privately he long lobbied for mandela's release. >> due to the effect that mandela ought to be released that we are making a bigger martyr of him every day that he stays in prison. and that is international acclaim. and it would be growing to an extent that we would not be able to hand it will any longer. unfortunately at that time it was. >> eight years later nelson mandela bake a free man. >> he spent 27 years in prison. and the day he was released he displayed the--he displayed the acumen and energy of a person who has been a president before, amazing. amazing what insight he had in the minds of people. and for that matter into world affairs. >> and central to the success of the negotiation t
for the question. the big accommodation that was made by the anc in the negotiations that led to the first election as you probably know was to keep the terms private property rights and the basic struts of the economy protected. that was the trade-off. the crude way of putting it is the vote and the right to have an effect in politics in exchange for no radical change in the economic structure, no radical redistribution of wealth. so 80% of land, 80% of wealth was held by whites, a minority of about 9%. and that entwining of race and class absolutely constrains the ability for a people to feel that political liberation was followed by economic liberation. and that is the biggest challenge for the government and for the society, is figuring out legal ways in which to alter those dynamics. now at the same time, in the last 19 years two million black people have moved into middle income stat that. -- strata. so not often, clearly, but also not enough so we want to be careful in terms of how we evaluate what's going on there. but certainly, that, you know, the entire thrust of the liberation movement
of germany, there was no topping their match. >> the heavy, wet snow couldn't dampen the election. in the fifth minute, they headed in to make it 1-0. his effort aided by a slippery ball that got away from the keeper. minds just couldn't come into its own and squandered the few chances they managed to create. nuremberg was clearly in control, but failed to put the game out of reach. after the break, he found his footing. he captured a long pass, equalizer in the 75th minute. and then the chipper had the golden opportunity to put them in the lead. they were happy to leave town with a point, and in your he will berle will have to do better after the winter break. >> and bayern munich are threatening to paul way. that makes saturday's clash etween all the more crucial. a win will go a long way to cementing their place as title challenger. >> winter has arrived, but despite the chilly temperatures, the team and its fans are basking in the warm glow of success. now the coach faces a major challenge. defending second place in the standings. >> there's alza lot of spirit. >> our job will
forward as the first black representative in that democratically elected government. in that way, they do have a great deal in common. you do see a very nervous and frightened group of white south africans wondering exactly what his presidency meant for them. and in some ways, you saw the same thing when mr. obama was on the verge of being elected. one other thing they have in common, we talk about mr. mandela serving 27 years in prison but we don't necessarily talk about why and what were the core issues there. they were dedicated to the premise of one person, one vote. so without that 1965 voting rights act, which is a direct product of the civil rights movement, mr. obama's presidency does not exist. they're bound together by that same issue and the activism that was required in order to make -- >> that's a good point. >> in addition to the comparisons between the two of them, which is important, i think the other remarkable thing is the thread of liberty that connects them across space and time. the abolitionist improvement inspired thorough who inspired gandhi who inspired mandela. i
on to become the country's first truly democratically elected leader. >> i nelson mandela do hereby swear to be faithful to the republic of south africa. >> born to a local chief, mandela was one of 13 children and the first member of his family to atend school. apartheid that made colored south africans second class citizens. as white south africa became more aggressive, so did he. as the head of the armed wing to have african national congress, the a.m.c., he led violent, sabotage attacks and was arrested and tried in 1962. he would spend 27 years in jail, but he was never forgotten. 4 eventually international and internal pressure led president declercq to announce apartheid would be dismantled and mandela would walk free. but he reached out to his former oppressors and tried to heal a divided nation. in 1993, he and declercq shared the nobel peace prize. > fellow south africans. we appreciate the con contribution they have made to the development of this country. >> in 1994, he voted for the first time with millions of his fellow black south africans. he became a statesman, an interna
of apartheid. he would go on to become the country's first truly democratically elected leader. >> i do hereby promise to be faithful to the republic of south africa. wasorn to a local chief, he one of 13 children and the first member of his family to attend school. he began opposing the white minority a policy of apartheid, laws that segregated society and made colored south africans second-class citizens. byst, mandela was moved gandhi. more aggressive, so did he. as the head of the armed wing of led ational congress, he violent sabotage attacks and was arrested and tried in 1962. he would spend 27 years in jail that he was never forgotten. eventually, international and to sayl pressure led apartheid would be dismantled down the mandela would walk free. rather than seek richer view hising, he reached out to former oppressors trying to heal a divided nation. 1990 three, they shared the nobel peace prize. for fellow south africans and we want them to is crucial toh the contribution they have made towards a democratic party. >> he voted for the first time in 1994 with millions of his fellow bla
'll hear from mandela himself in an interview from 1993 before he was elected president. >>> and now, to the massive storm slamming the central u.s. millions of americans from the southern plains and the midwest are coping with with frigid temperatures. drivers in southern illinois face treacherous travel. they're calling today ice friday in texas. manuel, good morning. >> good morning. it was nearly 80 degrees here earlier this week. now, it's frigid. hundreds of flights have been canceled. that is impacting travel to dallas from airports in los angeles and san francisco. crews here are trying to keep major overpasses like these from freezing over, but you can see right here what they are dealing with. ice has formed on most everything here. >> the nasty mix of freezing rain and sleet began falling across parts of texas thursday, leaving cars and streets coated with slick ice. >> it's not too bad, but it's starting to set in now and the worst stuff is starting to come in. >> forecasters expect up to a half inch of freezing rain in the dallas ft. worth area alone with the wintry syst
after mandela was elected president he turned to sport to help unite his still divided country. it was the 1995 rugby world cup. mandela encouraged the nation to believe in the slogan of one team, one country. the image of mandela wearing the color and handing the trophy to the team captain was a symbol of unification. 63,000 people in the stands for the game. afterwards, the captain summed up saying we didn't have the support of 63,000 south africans today, we have the support of 42 million. we are hearing from ali tonight. he taught us forgiveness on a grand scale. his was a spirit born free destined to soar above the rainbows. today, his spirit is soaring through the heavens. he is now forever free. >> some of the best in sports. >> it really is. >> thank you, dianna. >> nbc "nightly news" is coming up next. it is a one hour special report on nelson mandela. >> s once upon a time, an insurance clerk stumbled upon a cottage. [knock] no one was at home, but on the kitchen table sat three insurance policies. the first had lots of coverage. the second, only a little. but the thi
and then lost the presidential election to him. he paid his tribute at the end saying tata, we will miss you, using the african term for father, recognizing that nelson mandela is the father of his country. there is expected to be a funeral in a week. he'll lie in state. diane? >> terry moran reporting in from london tonight. "good morning america" co-anchor, robin roberts joins once again. we were talking about his smile, his vitality. he loved food. he loved dance. he loved music. he loved american movies. >> he loved it all. primarily he loved his children. it was so hard for him to be away and both of his wives that i talked to expressed that and how difficult and that's why he wanted so much family time when he was released from prison after all those years. on one of my recent visits, it was one when they received the bid for the world cup. unfortunately, nelson mandela was not able to go as they thought, so i sat down with graca machel, again married on his 80th birthday, many would say the truth love of his life and i asked her the lasting impact, the powerful impact of her husband.
hamid karzai said he won't sign it until after the country's elections from april. >>> the police department picking up pointers from usa today. according to usa today one in four are using a tactic known as tower dunk. >> that means they are tracking the ident and activity of thousands of cell phones, and at least two dozen are using a stingray, a mobile suitcase device used as a fake cell phone device to intercept calls. >>> safety improvements are coming to the railroad in the weak of last week's derail. . the new system will warn engineers of approaching speed reductions and will automatically apply an emergency brake in the speed is not lowered. >>> autopsy results are due in the death of a 16-year-old boy. officials now say first responders used every means possible to try and revive that boy. he went into cardiac arrest. the boy reportedly had an underlying medical condition. his family says he was clear to fly. >>> billy joel and shirley mcclain among those celebrated at kennedy honors. santana and opera serng marty no royo rounded out this lest of honorees. president obam
elected president of all south africans. i know that i speak on behalf of people in my constituency, holborn and st pancras, because they have a very special relationship with the anti- apartheid movement. the movement was founded at a meeting of about 60 people in holborn hall in the summer of 1959. its first leaflets were distributed a fortnight later outside camden town underground station. its headquarters were always located in our area, and it always had our support. local people were particularly delighted when mr mandela came to camden town in july 2003 to unveil a blue plaque in memory of ruth first, who was murdered by the south african secret police, and joe slovo, who was a member of president mandela's first cabinet. i am delighted that his daughter gillian slovo is here to observe our proceedings. over many years, committed people in britain campaigned against apartheid, the trials of the leaders of the african national congress and the imprisonments that followed. they continued to campaign against the oppression of all black south africans and of all the other people
rating as he heads into a possible re-election campaign. yesterday numbers show a field poll finds nearly 6 in 10 registered voters approve of his performance. 52% say they would vote for him. his closest challenger lieutenant governor able maldonado is backed by 11%. the governor hasn't said if he will seek another term. >>> the batkid returns to san francisco. 5-year-old miles scott of siskiyou county won our hearts last month as he saved the city from evil villains. that was his dream as he battled and beat cancer. miles will help a make a wish fundraiser tomorrow at the aquatic park at jefferson and hide streets with a 5-k run at 8:30. >>> live pictures of the caltrain christmas train. it's parked near at&t park at the caltrain station. beautiful. decorated with 60,000 glittering lights. the train will stop at stations between san francisco and santa clara tomorrow and sunday evening. so there will be entertainment but crews will be collecting toys for local children. >> a little feliz navidad. >>> time now 6:10. celebrating the life of nelson mandela. president obama reacts to the de
to be finished, but after mandela was released and after those first elections in south africa, so much more of this continent has become democratic. it's not a coincidence. >> christiane, so many world leaders when you talk about the leader of cuba, the united states and europe and african countries, it could not be more diverse. do you think there is a lesson, a takeaway they can come away from mandela? because you have such an incredible diverse group of world leaders who govern differently. >> wouldn't it be great. wouldn't that just be wonderful. there are certainly many leaders out there, many conflicts that could be resolved if a little bit of mandela's forgiveness and inclusion was employed. many long time dictator and authoritarians who make take a lesson out of mandela's playbook. he stepped down after one term. he promised to serve one term and kept that promise. sure, there are many, many leaders out there who could take some serious lessons to what mandela proved as a leader on the world stage. >> and particularly the areas of compromise and the like, too. >> and forgiveness. >>
are looking to 2014, mid-term elections as an opportunity for both sides. they've got to figure it out. >> what are you going to buy? quickly? besides the emerging markets? staying here in the u.s.? >> i think the biggest -- that doesn't happen i think we're okay. emerging markets will be the spot for next year. >> gentlemen, thank you both. good to see you. thanks for joining us today. we'll take a break. come back with the closing countdown for this thursday. in danger of a five-day losing streak overall. so far no up days for the month of december. >>> after the bell, they want $15 an hour. or no one gets a happy meal. fast food workers making their case today for higher wages. one will be joining us, coming up this next hour on the "closing bell." stay tuned. ♪ ♪ ♪ i wanna spread a little love this year ♪ ♪ i wanna spread a little love and cheer ♪ [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- provocative design and exacting precision come together in one powerful package at the lexus december to remember sales event, with some of the best offers of the year on our most
bash on how. >> reporter: this is exactly what republicans want to avoid in the next election -- >> if it's a legitimate rape, the female body has ways to try to shut that whole thing down. >> reporter: that comment not only cost republican todd aiken a senate seat, it knocked all republicans off message. now, republicans are training house candidates to communicate better with women and steer clear of such gaffes. >> trying to get them to be more sensitive. >> reporter: cnn is told that gop media training sessions, first reported by politico, include tutorials on how to avoid foot-in-mouth responses when talking about sensitive topics like abortion and rape. remember this republican fate-sealing moment? >> even when life begins in that horrible situation of rape, that it is something that god intended to happen. >> reporter: mitt romney lost female voters by 12%, the biggest gap in history. this sure didn't help. >> and brought us a whole binders full of women. >> reporter: part of the gop problem in congress? so few female gop lawmakers. out of 232 republican house members,
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